Soy

You'll say "Yum!" to the delicious taste of Organic Valley Soy. Our American-grown, Identity Preserved organic soybeans and whole-bean process give you the most delicious and nutritious soy available. Organic. It’s all we do!

  • Soy
  • Above and Beyond: Why Organic Valley Soy
  • Find Your Soy Farmer

All our soybeans are grown in America’s soybean belt. We have carefully selected soybean varieties ideal for soy beverages. Nature has provided us with perfect soybeans and we see no need to isolate, concentrate or re-engineer them. We test our identity-preserved organic soybeans to be free of genetic engineering before the crop is planted. We know that non-genetically modified soybeans make OV Soy superior—another product we are honored to produce in harmony with nature.

Dan and Joleen, and Dan Jr. and Amy Parizek

Dan and Joleen, and Dan Jr. and Amy Parizek

Tama, IA

Dan and his son, Dan Jr., farm 340 acres of organic soybeans, corn, oats, hay and rye in Tama County, Iowa. These hardworking men start out at six in the morning and don’t usually turn in until ten at night. Dan Jr. also sells farm implements at a nearby John Deere dealership. Parizek Farms was certified organic in 1999. Dan decided to transition to organic because he worried about how the chemicals used in conventional farming might negatively affect his health. His dad and three brothers had cancer, and his dad and one brother died from the disease. While he doesn't know if the cancer was caused by chemicals, Dan decided it wasn't worth taking the chance. Today, the Parizeks are happy to farm using only natural fertilizers and controlling weeds by cultivating between rows periodically throughout the growing season.

Todd Boss

Todd Boss

Manchester, IA

Todd Boss and Donna Swanson grew up as neighbors and fellow 4-Hers in Manchester. Five years after they finished school, Cupid struck. Now Todd and Donna happily run the Boss family's 70 year-old farm, while living on Donna's family farm down the road. Frustrated with shrinking margins in conventional farming, in 2000 they began to convert their land to organic crops, including corn, oats, hay and of course soy. Today, T&D Farms is a family affair, with the Boss' two children, Zach and Mikaela, pitching in when they're not busy with sports. "Farming organically has allowed us to have a more sustainable, safer cropping system," said Todd. "By growing organic, we hope to get back to our roots."

Todd Banes

Todd Banes

Elberon, IA

After 14 long months apart, Todd Banes, his wife, Kim, and their three children, Mitch, Shelbie, and Trent are together again on their family farm in Elberon, Iowa. Kim, who is in the National Guard, was suddenly called to serve in Iraq, and Todd was left to care for their farm and kids, while also working at his factory job. Todd started farming in 1981 and today he runs an 88-acre organic farm, which was previously owned by his grandparents. His farm became certified organic in 2002. One of the main reasons he went organic was to use fewer chemicals. Among his concerns was that pesticides would pollute the well that supplies water to his family's home. "I'm not an environmentalist, but I don't like contaminating the ground with all of those chemicals. This is my third year without using them, and I've noticed how much easier the ground works up. I'm really starting to see the benefits."

Gary Bakken

Gary Bakken

Decorah, IA

The Bakken family farmed conventionally for decades before converting to organic in 1996. The fourth generation to farm his land, Gary Bakken takes great pride in eschewing chemicals and "taking it back to the ways that his great grandfather operated." Today, Gary and his family pasture cattle and produce corn, oats and hay on their Northeast Iowa farm. Much of 350 acre farm consists of rolling hills, so they use contour strips to help reduce erosion. As the seasons change, the strips change color and become a beautiful array of colors.

Wayne Wangsness

Wayne Wangsness

Decorah, IA

Wayne Wangsness was only 3 when he first saw his family's picturesque farm, but the sight sparked a love affair with the land. It is this land that produced a major highlight of Wayne's 40-plus year farming career: a soybean. Several years ago, Wayne helped form a co-op of farmers who grow organic soybeans bred specifically for Organic Valley Soy. The beans represent Wayne's hard work and symbolize his farming philosophy: Grow something special and join with other farmers to market and sell it.
Today, Wayne has his son Ryan and his family farming with him. "I enjoy watching him grow as a farmer,” says Wayne. “I think it is every father's dream to have his son follow in his footsteps."

See more growers Previous Grower Next Grower
Share
Where to Buy Our Products
Search the Website
Animal Care
Beyond the Plate
Organic Valley on Facebook and Twitter Follow us on Twitter Friend us on Facebook
Where to Buy Our Products
Organic Valley